Presentations Glossary

Definitions and resources for terms and techniques used in the world of presentations

See Also:
PowerPoint and Presenting Blog
PowerPoint and Presenting Notes

Presentations Glossary in alphabetical order:
A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

« Older Entries « » Newer Entries »



Monday, July 1, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 3:41 pm

Evolution is an interesting concept because it’s the change that’s natural, logical, and involved. And although Themes (Office Themes) did not exist in their present form before Office 2007 for Windows, they did evolve from the humble PowerPoint template. And as you get deeper into how Themes work, you’ll find that PowerPoint uses these Themes in amazing ways, and shares them with Word and Excel. That’s the reason they are called Office Themes rather than PowerPoint Themes.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed Under: T
Tagged as: , ,

No Comments


Friday, June 28, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 2:57 pm

We have assembled variations of the color blue. Explore any of the colors that you want, and then use it within a PowerPoint slide or also within any other program.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed Under: C
Tagged as: , , ,

No Comments


Thursday, June 27, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 4:49 pm

Like RGB, where the alphabets stand for color names Red, Green, and Blue, CMYK also has one color name representing each alphabet – in this case, the colors are Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black. Do remember that CMYK has almost no use in a PowerPoint centric world, but you will often come across this terminology while receiving visual content for slides from other sources – so a little knowledge about CMYK can be very helpful.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed Under: C
Tagged as: , ,

No Comments


Wednesday, June 26, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 1:56 pm

Colors can be darker or lighter: and this in color terms is called Luminosity. Color can also be saturated (vibrant) or desaturated (neutralized). Desaturation can be done to a lesser extent or more, and when it happens to the maximum extent possible, that’s the same as completely neutralizing the color altogether. Think about converting a colored picture to grayscale and you will understand what may be happening! This property of color is called Saturation.

Now beyond Luminosity and Saturation lies the Hue of color. You can have a blue that’s dark or light, and even vibrant or neutralized. But you can also have a green, a red, an orange, a yellow, or any other color with those same attributes. This red, green, yellow, or blue property is nothing else but the Hue of the color.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed Under: C
Tagged as: , ,

No Comments


Tuesday, June 25, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 1:51 pm

Color is a fascinating subject; a subject that evokes enough creativity and pickles the minds of many. If we were to pause looking at color as a creative subject for just a brief amount of time, we would be able to explore it from a different perspective, the perspective of science! This color science will open new avenues for us to understand why colors behave in certain ways.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed Under: C
Tagged as: , ,

No Comments


Friday, June 21, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 3:09 pm

Luminosity, is one of the three properties described in HSL color model. So what is Luminosity? Luminosity is the value that spans from pure black (darkest) to pure white (lightest).

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed Under: C
Tagged as: , ,

No Comments


Tuesday, June 18, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 4:42 pm

While computers can easily understand the fact that you mix red and green to end up with yellow, that’s some strange logic to us humans which we shall never comprehend!

How can we stay within the RGB color model, which computers understand, and mix colors more creatively to use a method which we humans can understand? This need for a more creative model gave birth to the HSL (Hue, Saturation, and Luminosity) color model.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed Under: C
Tagged as: , ,

No Comments


Monday, June 17, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 2:06 pm

While we learned the basics about RGB colors, that constitute portions of Red, Blue, and Green—what we need to know is that there is so much more to learn about them. Did you know that there are two ways in which individual RGB color values are expressed? The most common way is using decimals.

But have you run into color values such as FF0000 or 006699? These six digit values that combine number and alphabet characters are hexadecimals. Now hexadecimals express the same values as decimals—but unlike decimals that need 9 characters to describe the three colors, R, G, and B, hexadecimals need only 6 characters.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed Under: C
Tagged as: , , ,

No Comments


Friday, June 14, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 7:26 pm

Art HoldenArt Holden has been in the animation and presentation industry since 1996. He helped start Animation Factory in 1997 and served as general manager of Animation Factory for thirteen years. He currently lives in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, USA and works with Presenter Media, a media content creating company.

Here’s a list of links on Indezine.com where Art Holden has been featured:

February 16, 2015
PresenterMedia Content and More: Conversation with Art Holden

August 29, 2012
PresenterMedia PowerPoint Add-in: Conversation with Art Holden

March 14, 2012
PresenterMedia Content: Conversation with Art Holden

March 17, 2010
PresenterMedia: Conversation with Art Holden

December 4, 2008
Animation Factory

Filed Under: A
Tagged as: , ,

No Comments


Thursday, June 13, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 3:47 pm

The three primary colors of this electronic color model are Red, Blue, and Green, and that explains why this model is called the RGB color model. RGB is essentially an abbreviation for Red Green Blue.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed Under: C
Tagged as: , ,

No Comments


« Older Entries « » Newer Entries »




Microsoft and the Office logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

Plagiarism will be detected by Copyscape

© 2000-2019, Geetesh Bajaj - All rights reserved.

since November 02, 2000