Presentations Glossary

Definitions and resources for terms and techniques used in the world of presentations

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PowerPoint and Presenting Blog
PowerPoint and Presenting Notes

Presentations Glossary in alphabetical order:
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Tuesday, August 6, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 2:02 pm

Super Themes in PowerPoint actually contain 8 Themes in all. This typically includes 4 widescreen (16:9) variations, and also 4 standard (4:3) variations. We navigated to the folder where Office Themes built-in within PowerPoint are typically stored.

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Monday, August 5, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 2:05 pm

THMX actually stands for an Office Theme Document file. However, what it hides is more important in this case than what it stands for. A THMX file and any of the new file formats that Office 2007 and later use are actually XML based file formats. Also they are more like a wrapper that contain many disparate and related elements.

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Friday, August 2, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 2:14 pm

A PPTX file or any of the new file formats that Office 2007 and later use such as POTX or THMX are different than the older binary file formats such as PPT. That’s because these new file formats that end with an “X” are essentially XML based file formats.

Even more interesting is the fact that the actual file is not an XML based file but only a wrapper that contain many disparate and related XML based elements. The wrapper technology used is just simple ZIP technology. If you want to edit Office XML files, you will therefore need to unzip, edit, and finally zip the file. Alternatively, you can perform XML Editing within Visual Studio 2010.

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Thursday, August 1, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 5:17 pm

Create a presentation in PowerPoint, using some of the built-in Themes, and you will have more options to change the look of your presentation slides slightly. By “slightly,” we mean that you don’t have to change to another Theme altogether, and yet you can make small changes in colors or design elements that still look very similar to your existing Theme. These small changes are “variants,” and a Theme that includes such variants is called a “SuperTheme”.

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Thursday, August 1, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 3:37 pm

All the new Office file formats (post Office 2007) are XML based, and can easily be opened and edited in an XML editing program. All these files are a bunch of XML files contained in a ZIP file container.

Although it is easy to unzip the files and edit some code in a basic program like Notepad, you will need a better program that does not require you to unzip and edit all the time, and then zip it up again! Thankfully there are plenty of programs that allow you to edit these Office XML files. Our favorite is Microsoft’s own Visual Studio. On its own, Visual Studio cannot open and edit Office XML files, but Microsoft provides a free add-in that plugs into Visual Studio and lets you edit the Office XML files.

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Tuesday, July 30, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 3:45 pm

When PowerPoint is launched, do you see an empty presentation with just one slide? This template influences the default look that PowerPoint provides. However, the first slide typically has placeholders for the slide’s title and subtitle. The text typed within these placeholders shows up in black over a white slide background. Although this default look works most of the time, you don’t have to stick with these defaults. You can easily change the default look to something else. For example, use your custom PowerPoint template or Theme as the default? Or even any of the other Templates/Themes built within PowerPoint.

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Friday, July 26, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 3:44 pm

Whenever you create a new presentation using PowerPoint for the iPad, you will first have to choose a Theme that will determine the appearance of your slides. A Theme is essentially something that determines the colors, fonts, effects, backgrounds, and layouts available to you as defaults within the slides you create.

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Thursday, July 25, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 4:43 pm

Unlike the Windows versions of PowerPoint which show the active Theme name on the Status bar, the Mac version does not show the active Theme name anywhere on its interface. If you need to know the active Theme’s name for any open presentation, how do you find this information?

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Wednesday, July 24, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 5:16 pm

Both PowerPoint 2010 and PowerPoint 2007 show the name of the active Theme for a presentation within the Status Bar. We look for a similar option within the PowerPoint 2013 interface. Note that there is no Theme name displayed on the Status Bar. However you can reinstate the Theme name.

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Friday, July 19, 2019, posted by Geetesh at 1:58 pm

The whole idea of Office Themes (since Office 2007) is to provide a coordinated look in Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, and PowerPoint slides. Beyond that, the Themes also influence objects such as tables and charts in these applications. Newer versions of Microsoft Office extend the concept of Office Themes to other Office applications including Outlook, Access, Publisher, Visio, OneNote, etc. In addition, Themes are also supported in both Office 2008 and 2011 for Mac.

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