Presentations Glossary

Definitions and resources for terms and techniques used in the world of presentations

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PowerPoint and Presenting Blog
PowerPoint and Presenting Notes

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Wednesday, November 8, 2017, posted by Geetesh at 1:04 pm

The Outline view is new for PowerPoint — wait, that’s not absolutely true since you always had access to your presentation’s text outline through the Slides/Outline pane on the left side of the PowerPoint interface. What’s changed though is that you no longer need to switch tabs within the pane — now you just access the outline within a new view! The Outline view displays all the text contained within the title and text placeholders of your slides and is one of the ten views in PowerPoint.

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Tuesday, November 7, 2017, posted by Geetesh at 3:09 pm

Soon after a power user installs a new application, he or she wants to customize their menus and toolbars so that their most often used features are accessible with fewer clicks — or even custom keyboard shortcuts. And even if you are not a power user, you should explore a very useful option that we explain in this tutorial — this will make your tasks easier, and quicker. While PowerPoint’s recent versions on Windows have almost no menus and toolbars, they do have a single toolbar called the Quick Access Toolbar. Almost everyone who uses this toolbar just calls it the QAT, and that’s the name we will use for the rest of this tutorial.

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Tuesday, November 7, 2017, posted by Geetesh at 10:27 am

PowerPoint work area below the Ribbon continues to be tri-paned. These three panes comprise the Slides Pane, the Slide Area, and the Notes Pane. The Slides Pane is the thin strip on the left side of the PowerPoint interface that contains thumbnails of all your slides. Within Normal view, the Slide Pane allows you to move slides easily from one position to the other just by dragging and dropping.
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Monday, October 30, 2017, posted by Geetesh at 12:35 pm

PowerPoint does provide most editing options to make alterations within the Ribbon tabs, and you can also populate your Quick Access Toolbar with frequently used commands. Yet, all these tasks involve moving your cursor to the Ribbon, located above the Slide Area and back continuously. While this movement may not result in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, it helps to know that PowerPoint also includes the Mini Toolbar, a floating toolbar that spawns right next to the cursor, and it is also available instantly with a right-click!

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Friday, October 13, 2017, posted by Geetesh at 2:40 pm

The Status Bar is a thin strip located at the bottom of the PowerPoint 2016 interface. This area provides information about the active slide and also provides several View options. To work with options in the Status Bar, you must have a presentation open in PowerPoint; otherwise, the options within the Status Bar will be grayed out.
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Tuesday, October 10, 2017, posted by Geetesh at 1:02 pm

When launched, PowerPoint typically opens the Presentation Gallery. This Presentation Gallery provides several ways to start your next presentation using a template, a Theme, a recent presentation, a not-so-recent presentation, or even a blank presentation. These and other choices are explained in this tutorial.

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Friday, September 15, 2017, posted by Geetesh at 12:32 pm

When you start creating a new presentation, many users just launch PowerPoint and start creating their slides. Actually, there are three common ways in which you can create slides. Yet, the best way to start creating presentation slides is not from within PowerPoint but by creating an outline in another program. Many purists say that you should not even launch PowerPoint until you have an outline in place.

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Thursday, September 14, 2017, posted by Geetesh at 12:02 pm

Unlike slides which are primarily presented through a display device such as a monitor, TV screen or projector, the Notes and Handout pages in PowerPoint are essentially intended for printing. In this tutorial, we will explore how you can add Headers and Footers to make your printed Notes and Handout pages more professional-looking and useful.

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Tuesday, September 12, 2017, posted by Geetesh at 10:09 am

The terms Header and Footer typically come from word processing programs; these denote repeated elements that show at the top and bottom of every page. Headers and Footers work similarly on PowerPoint slides: the Footer is a line of text that usually appears at the bottom of a slide. Typically, the Footer area includes three placeholders: Date, Footer, and Slide number. By default, the footer with one or more of these three placeholders appear on every slide in a presentation, but you can change that as required.

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Thursday, September 7, 2017, posted by Geetesh at 12:28 pm

If you have a presentation with a large Section, containing many slides, then you may find that this one Section makes it difficult to see all the other remaining Sections. This is because these many slides cover up so much screen real estate making it difficult for you to see other stuff, such as slides in other Sections. And if you want to drag a slide from one Section to another, you may be at a loss to comprehend what you will end up with. So to counter this problem, you can collapse and expand single and multiple Sections.

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