Presentations Glossary

Definitions and resources for terms and techniques used in the world of presentations

See Also:
PowerPoint and Presenting Blog
PowerPoint and Presenting Notes

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Tuesday, October 19, 2021, posted by Geetesh at 5:01 pm

Let’s imagine you got your animation just right. You tweaked the speed and set the animation event. You also added a series of simultaneous and sequential animations to the same slide object, so that it fades and wipes at the same time; then it grows in size, stays on screen without animation for a requisite amount of time using a delay, and finally, the object exits using a simple fade animation. Now, you need to apply the same animation to 50 other slide objects within the presentation! The Animation Painter can help.

To learn more, choose your version of PowerPoint. If we do not have a tutorial for your version of PowerPoint, explore the version closest to the one you use.

Microsoft Windows

Animation Painter in PowerPoint 2013

Animation Painter in PowerPoint 2010

Animation Painter in PowerPoint

Tutorial Code: 13 03 10
Previous: 13 03 09 Build and Sequence Animations in PowerPoint
Next: 13 03 11 Animation Sounds in PowerPoint

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Tuesday, October 19, 2021, posted by Diamond Indezine at 9:27 am

Paul J. Radich
  
Paul J. Radich has worked with Dr. Andrew Abela on the development and delivery of the Extreme Presentation workshop since its inception in 2005. He has served on the Ethics Committee of the American Marketing Association and is Assistant Professor and Marketing Area Head in the School of Business and Economics at The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC. His areas of focus include consumer behavior, marketing strategy, and international marketing. He provides consulting and education on effective communication of complex information, for major organizations like JPMorgan Chase, Visa, Volkswagen, and the US White House Executive Councils.

Here’s a list of links on Indezine.com where he has been featured:

The Encyclopedia of Slide Layouts: Conversation with Paul J. RadichThe Encyclopedia of Slide Layouts: Conversation with Paul J. Radich
June 5, 2015


The Encyclopedia of Slide Layouts: Conversation with Dr. Andrew AbelaThe Encyclopedia of Slide Layouts: Conversation with Dr. Andrew Abela
June 3, 2015

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Thursday, October 14, 2021, posted by Geetesh at 4:08 pm

Animation is movement and fine art at the same time. Using animation’s powerful capabilities of attracting attention, you can effectively illustrate a concept, a process, or anything else. However, there’s a thin dividing line between mere movement and utter confusion. Imagine a training session where the presenter moves around the room explaining a concept. As he or she moves, the eyes of the audience members follow him or her. There is a clear focus in the room, and the subject of that focus is the presenter. Now imagine another situation where the presenter and all the audience members in the room start moving in disparate directions just for the sake of movement. At this point in time, the movement has given way to chaos. The distinction between movement and chaos works similarly on PowerPoint slides. At any point in time, the movement needs to have focus and direction, and more importantly, a reason to move!

To learn more, choose your version of PowerPoint. If we do not have a tutorial for your version of PowerPoint, explore the version closest to the one you use.

Microsoft Windows

Build and Sequence Animations in PowerPoint 2013 and 2010

Build and Sequence Animations in PowerPoint 2007

Apple Mac

Build and Sequence Animations in PowerPoint 2011

Build and Sequence Animations in PowerPoint

Tutorial Code: 13 03 09
Previous: 13 03 08 Animation Delay in PowerPoint
Next: 13 03 10 Animation Painter in PowerPoint

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Friday, October 8, 2021, posted by Geetesh at 2:37 pm

Once you add animation to any slide object, you can set its animation speed and choose an animation event. Other than speed and event, you can also alter the delay caused before the animation actually starts. So why would you add a delay? There are several reasons and primarily a delay can be beneficial if you want to maintain a time limit between two animations — as in having the second animation occur 10 seconds after the first one has started/concluded.

Microsoft Windows

Animation Delay in PowerPoint 2013

Animation Delay in PowerPoint 2010

Apple Mac

Animation Delay in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac

Advanced Animation Concepts: Animation Delay in PowerPoint

Tutorial Code: 13 03 08
Previous: 13 03 07 Control Animation Timings using the Advanced Timeline in PowerPoint
Next: 13 03 09 Build and Sequence Animations in PowerPoint

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Monday, October 4, 2021, posted by Geetesh at 2:20 pm

The main advantage of the Advanced Timeline in PowerPoint is to edit the timing and sequencing of your animations. You can easily control the start time, duration, and end time of your animation to the most minute level. In addition, you can also animate any slide object very slowly to span over a whole minute or more by just dragging the start and end-points of any animation bar outwards in the timeline.

To learn more, choose your version of PowerPoint. If we do not have a tutorial for your version of PowerPoint, explore the version closest to the one you use.

Microsoft Windows

Control Animation Timings using the Advanced Timeline in PowerPoint 2013

Control Animation Timings using the Advanced Timeline in PowerPoint 2010

Control Animation Timings using the Advanced Timeline in PowerPoint 2007

Control Animation Timings using the Advanced Timeline in PowerPoint

Tutorial Code: 13 03 07
Previous: 13 03 06 Show and Hide the Advanced Animation Timeline in PowerPoint
Next: 13 03 08 Animation Delay in PowerPoint

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