Presentations Glossary

Definitions and resources for terms and techniques used in the world of presentations

See Also:
PowerPoint and Presenting Blog
PowerPoint and Presenting Notes

Presentations Glossary in alphabetical order:
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Friday, August 10, 2018, posted by Geetesh at 12:29 pm

In PowerPoint, when you type text within a text or Content placeholder, the default result is that you end up creating a bulleted list. Also, when you import an outline, all the content other than the slide titles ends up becoming bulleted text. While this may work in some situations, at other times you may want to either remove the bullets altogether, or convert it to a numbered list.

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Thursday, August 9, 2018, posted by Geetesh at 5:01 pm

PowerPoint expects you first to make a selection, and then do something such as clicking a button to perform an action for the selected slide objects. If you cannot select an object, then you cannot modify it at all. Although this tutorial explains how you can select shapes on a slide, the process works the same way for any other slide object.

To learn more, choose your version of PowerPoint. If we do not have a tutorial for your version of PowerPoint, explore the version closest to the one you use.

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Wednesday, August 8, 2018, posted by Geetesh at 1:04 pm

Backstage view is not akin to other PowerPoint views such as Slide Sorter view or Normal view that relate to working with slides. In fact, Backstage view is not a view in those terms, because you can be using Normal view (to work with slides) and Backstage view (to work with options) at the same time. Consider Backstage view as an over-sized menu that gives you access to many options. In PowerPoint 2016 for Mac, Backstage view and Presentation Gallery are one and the same for most purposes, except the way they are accessed. Let us explore existing features within Backstage view.

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Monday, August 6, 2018, posted by Geetesh at 12:47 pm

Yes, you can manually compare your presentations, keeping them side by side. This option works great if there are very few changes. For anything more involved, you will want to use the Compare feature that combines two presentations provided by you, and then shows you the differences between them.

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Thursday, August 2, 2018, posted by Geetesh at 11:59 am

You have already learned about picture bullets, and how you can import any picture and use it as a custom bullet. You can also create your own picture bullets to use in presentations, and these can be created right within PowerPoint!

To learn more, choose your version of PowerPoint. If we do not have a tutorial for your version of PowerPoint, explore the version closest to the one you use.

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Tuesday, July 31, 2018, posted by Geetesh at 2:08 pm

PowerPoint lets you change the appearance of merged shapes. However, don’t assume that just because this is so easy-to-use, the end results won’t be seriously impressive. Together, there are five options that let you merge shapes, and we have already explored four of them. In this tutorial, we’ll show you how you can use the Subtract option to subtract one shape (or even multiple shapes), from the first selected shape.

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Monday, July 30, 2018, posted by Geetesh at 12:15 pm

While PowerPoint does have an option to automatically compare presentations, sometimes doing this comparison manually can be actually more effective, especially when you have fewer changes in the first place. You can place both presentations side by side and compare individual slides.

To learn more, choose your version of PowerPoint. If we do not have a tutorial for your version of PowerPoint, explore the version closest to the one you use.

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Friday, July 27, 2018, posted by Geetesh at 5:20 pm

PowerPoint enables you to use picture bullets rather than the conventional symbol bullets. And, while you can choose from an impressive collection of ready-to-use picture bullets, you can also import your own pictures to create a unique bullet style for your text lists. So, why would you want to import your own picture bullets? Probably because you want their color to match your company branding, or you want to use a stylized bullet that matches your logo. Whatever your reason may be, do remember that detailed graphics don’t work well as bullets. The more closer your graphic looks to the conventional dot-shaped bullet, the better it will appear for consistency and visual reasons.

To learn more, choose your version of PowerPoint. If we do not have a tutorial for your version of PowerPoint, explore the version closest to the one you use.

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Wednesday, July 25, 2018, posted by Geetesh at 1:14 pm

PowerPoint provides you with umpteen options to change the appearance of your bullet points. You can change bullet styles, format the bullet size and its color, and use pictures as bullets. In addition, you can use a character from any font, including dingbats as a bullet. So what are dingbats? Dingbats are fonts which contain decorative symbols rather than alphabets and numbers. Wingdings is a good example of a dingbats font since it is installed by default on all computers.

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Wednesday, July 18, 2018, posted by Geetesh at 7:51 pm

PowerPoint provides several bullet styles that you can choose from, but they do look a little canned since almost every PowerPoint slide these days uses the same bullet styles! You could get rid of bullets altogether and use small sentences/paragraphs instead, or maybe you could explore picture bullets, to insert any picture as your bullet. Of course, for picture bullets to work, your picture needs to be small, no larger than a medium-sized dot. And it helps if it has transparent areas. If all this talk about the size and transparency of a picture bullet makes you curious, don’t worry because we explain it all!

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